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Hi all,

Does anyone know the proper way to sell an image to someone who wishes to place as their coverpage on an internet site?   Softcopy only.   I am not concerned with the price, but more about offering as a single price vs. pricing using some other method.  Are their standards of this?  I do not often sell my images and this is the first offer I have had with this type of softcopy.  I will research internet, but if anyone has some good suggestions, that would be appreciated.

 

Thanks,

Richard


Richard Schoettger

   
Chatty
Registered: 03/14/11
Posts: 57
Location: Singapore
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First off, we don't "sell" our images. We license specific rights for a specific period of time and we always do it with a written license agreement that stipulates the rights, duration and fee.

I use Fotoquote as a resource for researching license fees. It has recommendations on license fees for hundreds of different uses based on historical data. Many people say "check GettyImages". I say don't check GettyImages. Getty often has large contracts in place which gives buyers enormous discounts based on volumes so their license fees tend to be much lower than fair market value.

The cover page for a website is the prized placement. If the image will be displayed in larger format covering most of the page, it should garner top dollar for the type of site and number of visitors the site gets. You will need to get information from the site owner about how many visitors their site gets, whether the usage will be editorial (commentary) use or commercial use (advertising) or some other use. If you purchase Fotoquote, it has all kinds of coaching information that will help you develop a list of questions to ask the potential client that you will then use to determine your license fee. Don't dictate a fee, not even a "ball park" fee, without having all the right information.

I'm heading into a meeting so I can't elaborate more on what specific questions you need answered. I recommend purchasing and downloading Fotoquote. It will pay for itself on your first use.

   
Active Member
Registered: 12/03/09
Posts: 208
Location: Columbia, Maryland
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Thanks Walter for taking the time to answer.  I will  certainly follow up as you suggested and see where this goes.   I have not delved seriously into licensing any of my images yet, only selling prints occasionally and for fun.  Thanks again and much appreciated.    Richard


Richard Schoettger

   
Chatty
Registered: 03/14/11
Posts: 57
Location: Singapore
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We do a fair bit of it, always with a licensing agreement specifying size of use (usually 1/4-, 1/2-, or full-page), duration of contract period, fee (usually a one-time fee for the duration of the contract), and prohibitions.  We usually include renewal terms, as well.  BTW- We also keep our calander marked with end dates for various contracts, and we send a reminder to clients 60 days before expiration, along with an offer to renew the contracts or to meet with them to submit "fresh" images to replace the old.  It's surprising how often that results in follow-up sales, rather than end of contracts.

Like Walter, we rely on Fotoquote to develop our rate and term quotes, as well as to help us in negotiations.

   
Junior
Registered: 07/26/10
Posts: 25
Location: Kodiak, AK
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 How do people find your information to ask for your work?  What have you found to be most effecive for this?  I have had some success, but that was after I chased them a bit.  I wouldn't mind having them come to me...  you know?  But I'll take what I can get.  Any more advice would great on this topic.  Thanks i advance!

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Hi Mike,

Unfortunately, I don't think there are many successful photographers who have clients finding them. You have to market yourself. With so much royalty free content out there for clients to peruse at next to nothing in license fees, you have to get your work in front of them and show them you have something better that is worth paying rights-managed license fees to use If you can convince them that your work is excellent and they will save time and money in the long run by going straight to you instead of assigning an assistant to peruse royalty free sites for hours or days, then you can get them to call you for work.

You also need a website or online storage that can also double as a market place. PhotoShelter offers storage/marketing. Many are now using 500px.com to display portfolios. LiveBooks is a well known website design and hosting company used by many commercial photographers. There is also "aPhotoFolio.com".

For marketing there are mailing lists you can subscribe to for sending out emails to prospective clients like ADBASE and AdAge. There are email tools like MailChimp and ConstantContact for creating and sending out email blitzes.

The bottom line is you have to do what you can to find clients. Once you find some, you have to cultivate those relationships and keep them. It is far easier to keep a good client than to find and develop a new one.


Walter Rowe, Editor
Travel Photographers.net

   
Admin
Registered: 12/03/09
Posts: 185
Location: A Global Community
6 posts :: Page 1 of 1