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 Hi,

I realize that I need a polarizing lens, with my digital slr, I understand that I need a circular rather than linear lens (there is an article on Wickipedia about this).  But there are so many to choose from...Some say that they are glass, does that mean that the others are plastic?  Presumably plastic is a bad idea when I do lots of traveling?  What about brass rings, are they important?  The price range is significant, so I want to figure out what will work best.  I have three lenses.  The 18-55 mm and the 55-200 are both 52mm diameter.  My macro lens is 55 mm diameter.  I am thinking that it would make more sense to buy a 52 mm polarizing lens, as it seems that reflection is less of a problem in macro photos?

Any advice greatly appreciated.

Victoria

   
Junior
Registered: 09/10/11
Posts: 33
Location: Rockbridge, Ohio
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Hi Victoria,

We use them a lot in diverse climates and locations, so I can answer your questions plus a few you didn't ask.

We use Hoya or B/W Schneider exclusively. That's because no only is their glass completely neutral or tint- or hue-free, but also because the metal parts are brass beneath that black coating. In our experience the cheaper ones with aluminum rings are badly prone to jamming in dusty areas, whether onto the lens itself or onto other things like adapter rings. And adapter rings are an important element for you with multiple lens sizes.

In your situation with both 52mm and 55mm lenses, I'd get the 55mm polarizer along with a 55-52mm adapter ring (but make sure it's brass, probably from B/W Schneider).  I haven't looked into Hoya rings, but I would hope they're brass too.  The adapter ring will let you use the same filter on both size lenses, while being lots lighter and cheaper than owning two polarizers.

Over the very long term, there's another approach. I've consciously selected lenses that all have the same size front element (77mm in my case), so I don't have to mess with adapter rings any more.  It's not mandatory, but the size of the front element is certainly a factor in choosing new lenses down the road, especially if it means you'll have to buy new filters to go with it.

As for reflections from the extra glass your filter adds to your lens, it's not an issue at all if you keep direct sunlight from striking the front of the lens/filter. I use lens hoods most of the time, but any time they're not sufficient to completely shadow the front of the filter, I hold one hand up in just the right spot to throw a shadow onto the front of the lens.

I hope that helps.  The extra money is well worth investing in quality polarizers, not only to assure neutral glass (cheap ones often aren't) but also for the brass rings.

   
Junior
Registered: 07/26/10
Posts: 25
Location: Kodiak, AK
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Thank you so much!  That is really useful information.  It also happens that my local camera shop chain carries Hoya, so I can check them out.  Also I had now idea about adaptor rings, so I might have spent much more money than I needed to.

Victoria

   
Junior
Registered: 09/10/11
Posts: 33
Location: Rockbridge, Ohio
3 posts :: Page 1 of 1