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Hi, I was trying out my new Canon 100-400mm lense in Shenandoah National Park recently. Love this lense for photographing birds and wildlife. When I tried to shoot the sunet with the center of the sun a few degrees above horizon, the images consistently have reflective spots. With my wide angle or canon kit lenses, no reflective spots on the image. I'm obviously trying to enlarge the sun in the photos. Is there something I'm doing wrong? I am not using any filters.  (I take precautions to protect my eyes and to protect the camera while waiting for the right setting.) Thanks in advance!

   
Newbie
Registered: 05/22/11
Posts: 2
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This is called "lens flare". You are seeing reflections inside the lens. The more direct the light enters the lens, the more likely you are to see it. Click the link I provided to read more details about what causes it on CambridgeInColour.com.


Walter Rowe, Editor
Travel Photographers.net

   
Admin
Registered: 12/03/09
Posts: 185
Location: A Global Community
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 Thanks for bringing this up.  I recently saw these on sunset photos I took on the Amazon.  

The link you provided, Walter, is very useful.  They mention the quality of UV lenses. I confess that I have primarily thought of these as lens protectors and bought the cheap ones.  Do the $40 really make a diference?

Thanks,

Victoria

   
Junior
Registered: 09/10/11
Posts: 33
Location: Rockbridge, Ohio
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I cannot attest to the quality of any particular UV filter or brand. However, different filter makers have different methods for constructing them. Some are multi-coated with special material to help reduce flare and insure the best image quality as light passes through the filter. For every element that light passes through between the first on the front of the lens and the last one in the back of the lens, light is altered in some way. The goal is to minimize as much as possible the negative impact alterations while implementing the desired alterations. For example, you want your UV filter to limit UV frequency light from passing further into the camera body, but you also want to insure that the filter does not soften the image or distort it in any way and that it does not produce flare from internal reflections in the filter or between the filter and front lens element.

A quick search in Google brought me back to a Cambridge in Colour page on filters. The section on UV filters echoes what I read on some other sites. UV filters were very necessary for film cameras because film was much more sensitive to light than digital sensors, especially in the blue color channel that UV is nearest in the color spectrum.

I don't know that "the more you pay, the better you get", but I am certain that the cheapest filters on the market cause more image degradation than the more expensive ones.


Walter Rowe, Editor
Travel Photographers.net

   
Admin
Registered: 12/03/09
Posts: 185
Location: A Global Community
4 posts :: Page 1 of 1